The Most Timeless Songs of All-Time – Polygraph

Until recently, it was impossible to measure the popularity of older music. Billboard charts and album sales only tell us about a song’s popularity at the time of its release.

But now we have Spotify, a buffet of all of music, new and old. Tracks with fewer plays are fading into obscurity. And those with more plays are remaining in the cultural ether.

That’s not exactly true. Record companies have data on which music sold over time, and what got radio play, but now, with Spotify and Apple Music, we have real data on which music people want to hear.

This is a fascinating page. It also highlights the age of music listeners, showing how more recent music – from the 1990s to the present – is more popular. I think this is because people who stream music are more likely to be younger.

Source: The Most Timeless Songs of All-Time – Polygraph

6 thoughts on “The Most Timeless Songs of All-Time – Polygraph

  1. Hysterically/historically ignorant. Robert Schumann composed one of the most-popular songs of all time in 1840. Why isn’t it on this list? Could it be that children’s tastes matter more than adults’?

    As the article points out, popularity and quality have little relationship. If songs just 20 years old are being forgotten — maybe it proves something about them.

  2. Hysterically/historically ignorant. Robert Schumann composed one of the most-popular songs of all time in 1840. Why isn’t it on this list? Could it be that children’s tastes matter more than adults’?

    As the article points out, popularity and quality have little relationship. If songs just 20 years old are being forgotten — maybe it proves something about them.

  3. In 2004, Rolling Stone published a list laughingly called “The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.” After viewing it, I decided it was bad enough that Bishop Ussher thought that time began in 4004 BC, because the Rolling Stone editors put it at 1948 AD.
    Where was “The Man in the Flying Trapeze”? “L’Homme Armé”? “A Bicycle Built for Two”? “Pastime With Good Company”? Or even, for goodness’ sake, “Greensleeves”? I guess those dolts just don’t want to pay any attention to anything outside their limited scope. Or, more likely, they just failed to give the proper title to their narrow-minded list.
    So, I now give such lists all the attention I feel they deserve, which is none at all.

  4. In 2004, Rolling Stone published a list laughingly called “The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.” After viewing it, I decided it was bad enough that Bishop Ussher thought that time began in 4004 BC, because the Rolling Stone editors put it at 1948 AD.
    Where was “The Man in the Flying Trapeze”? “L’Homme Armé”? “A Bicycle Built for Two”? “Pastime With Good Company”? Or even, for goodness’ sake, “Greensleeves”? I guess those dolts just don’t want to pay any attention to anything outside their limited scope. Or, more likely, they just failed to give the proper title to their narrow-minded list.
    So, I now give such lists all the attention I feel they deserve, which is none at all.

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