Thinking in Monochrome — Craft & Vision

If you knew nothing of the history of photography, eliminating such a powerful visual element as colour from your work may seem a very odd thing to do, especially today when technology allows us to make spectacularly colourful images and prints. And yet, there is no denying that a black and white photograph may possess unique qualities that in many cases make it not only visually pleasing in its own right, but at times more so than a colour image of the same subject or scene. This may seem counter-intuitive, as humans evolved to ascribe great importance and meaning to colours, and the reasons are well worth considering for anyone seeking to expand their visual vocabulary.

Some great examples of why black and white photography works better sometimes.

Source: Thinking in Monochrome — Craft & Vision

4 thoughts on “Thinking in Monochrome — Craft & Vision

  1. I have a mirrorless camera with an electronic viewfinder. About a year ago I set up the viewfinder to render in black and white only. I think it is the single best thing I have ever done to improve my photography. For me, a good black and white viewfinder composition will predict a good color picture more often than will a color composition.

    • Indeed, I’ve done that on mine, except when I’m shooting landscapes. It does let you ignore the colors and focus more on the composition.

  2. I have a mirrorless camera with an electronic viewfinder. About a year ago I set up the viewfinder to render in black and white only. I think it is the single best thing I have ever done to improve my photography. For me, a good black and white viewfinder composition will predict a good color picture more often than will a color composition.

    • Indeed, I’ve done that on mine, except when I’m shooting landscapes. It does let you ignore the colors and focus more on the composition.

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