Virtuoso mourns beloved £150,000 piano smashed by movers – The Guardian

A unique piano which was treasured by the Canadian virtuoso Angela Hewitt as her “best friend” was broken beyond repair when it was dropped by specialist instrument movers.

The expensive accident happened late last month after Hewitt finished recording Beethoven’s piano variations at a studio in Berlin. She said it left her in such shock that it took her 10 days before she could announce the news to her followers.

In a Facebook post Hewitt said her F278 Fazioli, the only one in the world fitted with four pedals, and worth at least £150,000, was “kaputt”. She said: “I hope my piano will be happy in piano heaven.”

The broken instrument was inspected by the firm’s Italian founder, Paolo Fazioli, who declared it “unsalvageable”. The piano’s iron frame smashed when the 590kg instrument dropped as movers tried to lift it on to a trolley. The force of the break, compounded by the high tensions in the piano’s strings, was so strong that it split the piano’s lid in two.

“It makes no sense, financially or artistically, to rebuild this piano from scratch. It’s kaputt,” Hewitt said.

The accident left Hewitt in mourning. She said: “I adored this piano. It was my best friend, best companion. I loved how it felt when I was recording – giving me the possibility to do anything I wanted.”

This is incredibly sad. She is a great pianist, and her recordings of Bach are some of the best on the instrument.

Source: Virtuoso mourns beloved £150,000 piano smashed by movers | Music | The Guardian

2 thoughts on “Virtuoso mourns beloved £150,000 piano smashed by movers – The Guardian

  1. Sad but it sounds like she’ll handle this, and move on with a new Fazioli. I have her 2008 Well Tempered, which was probably recorded with this instrument. Along with Jan Belder’s WTC (fortepiano!) and “hum along with” Glenn Gould’s, this one is my favorite.

  2. It’s sad when we lose a great work of art like that piano. Hewitt is a fine artist and will find a way to move forward, however she does. Best wishes to her and we, as her audience, hope she’ll find another instrument that will support her art.

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