What to do with a Dead iPod

For many of us, who have had iPods for several years, the time is fast approaching when our iPods will die. They have a limited life-span, like all electronic devices, and at best, the batteries will die; at worst, they will go to hard drive heaven.

But even when your iPod is dead, you may find uses for it. If you don’t want to spend your hard-earned money on repairs, and would rather buy a new iPod–which does make sense in many cases–is it worth simply tossing the old one? Here are some ideas for using a dead iPod.

First of all, you need to decide how dead your iPod is. If its hard drive has cashed in its chips, then it’s really dead; there’s not much you can do on your own. It’s probably best to go to an iPod repair service and have the hard drive replaced. That’ll cost you much less than buying a new iPod.

Aside from the hard drive, there are many other components that can die: the screen, the backlight, or the actual digital signal processor (the chip that converts bits and bytes to notes). Failures to any of these components can result in a dead iPod – and many are reparable – but, in some cases, even without going for a fix-up, you can use the iPod.

If the backlight has died, you’ll still be able to see the screen if you hold it at the correct angle (though not in the dark; get into shuffling your songs!). If the screen itself is dead, you can get it fixed, and probably should if the iPod is recent enough (though see below for other uses for an iPod). And if the DSP is gone, well, basta; you can use it as a paperweight, or simply keep it on a shelf as a reminder. Or perhaps sell it to your local geek who might want its parts…

However, in my experience, this sort of catastrophic failure is pretty rare. Generally, such events occur early on in your iPod ownership (following the general rule of tech problems: the first month is crucial), or after several years of hard usage. The most common reason your iPod will die – aside from your dropping it and breaking the screen or ruining the hard disk – is because its battery will have reached its limit. iPod batteries generally last two to three years, depending on how often you use the iPod. You can replace them, sure, but it’s not for everyone. Several companies sell iPod battery replacement kits, including instructions – and you can get some from Amazon.com – but for those not technically inclined, this can be a daunting task.) While I’m a card-carrying geek, I haven’t bothered to try replacing the battery in any of my old iPods, because it seems to be too much of a hassle. But, again, there are companies out there that can fix it for you, so you don’t have to get your hands dirty or even worry about damaging the iPod’s other elements.

If you don’t want to replace your iPod’s battery, or don’t feel it’s worthwhile, you can still use your iPod as a music source, as long as it is plugged into an AC adapter. If you don’t have one, you can buy one for $29, or you can buy a combination cigarette-lighter charger and FM transmitter for your car (my favorite is the Monster iCarPlay). Just connect the iPod to the adapter then to your car stereo, or your home stereo, perhaps with an Apple iPod Dock, and turn it on. You’ll have plenty of music, and for a very long time (or at least until another component goes south). You may find that having an iPod just for the car or for your stereo is very useful. Personally, I use an iPod connected to my stereo through the Dock, and control it with Apple’s Remote.

Another way to use an iPod sans battery is to use it as a music source for iTunes on your computer, at home or at work. If you manually copy music to the iPod (which you can still do, even without a battery, as long as the iPod is connected to power), you can then connect the iPod to any computer running iTunes and play its music back, browsing, using playlists, or simply selecting songs, exactly as if it were an iTunes music library on that computer.

If you don’t use a battery-less iPod for music, remember that your iPod is also a hard disk or flash memory device. Because of this, it can come in very handy, even with no battery power. Say you have an 8 GB iPod with a dead battery; you now have a portable 8 GB hard disk. When you connect it to your computer, it will have to power up, but you’ll then be able to use it to transfer files from one computer to another, such as between your home and office computers. (Note that you can’t do this with an iPod touch…)

To use the iPod in this manner, connect it to your computer. On the iPod screen, uncheck Open iTunes when this iPod is attached, then check Enable disk use. Check Manually manage music and videos, then click the iPod in the iTunes Source list and select everything, then press Delete. (You’ll have backed up any music that’s only on that iPod first, of course…) Check the other tabs to make sure there is nothing set to update: podcasts, photos, videos, contacts, etc.

You’ll now have a totally empty iPod, ready for use as a hard disk. Just unmount it (click the arrow next to its name in the iTunes source list), and, the next time you connect it, the iPod will power up and mount on your computer. (You’ll need to connect it to a powered USB or FireWire port–depending on the model–in order for it to work as a hard disk. But as long as it gets power from your computer, it will spin, and you can copy files to and from it.)

Many people (unfortunately) never back up files from their computers, then, when something goes wrong, complain about losing all their hard work. With an old iPod as a backup drive, you have no excuse–just connect it, copy your personal files, then unmount it. Depending on its capacity, you may have a small drive for a handful of files, or as much as 160 GB of disk space to store your photos, music and videos.

If you can think of any other ways to use a dead iPod, add comments to this story. While the above hints are very useful, I’m sure my readers have their own ways of using their iPods. Finally, if you don’t plan to use it, find a geek who will take it off your hands, or, if you are going to dump it, contact Apple to find out how to have it recycled correctly. There are some evil metals in an iPod, and if you toss it in the trash, it will do some bad things to the environment.

84 thoughts on “What to do with a Dead iPod

  1. O.K., I know that there must be other uses for a dead iPod besides what’s
    already been mentioned here. But, for the life of me, right now, I can’t think
    of any more. So, how about some frivolous uses? Here goes…

    Other (Tongue-in-Cheek) Uses for a Dead iPod:

    o Use individual dead iPods as paperweights.

    o Or, tie about 5 dead iPods together, to make a functional (and classy!)
    doorstop.

    o Or, tie about 50 dead iPods together, then tie them to one end of a sturdy
    rope or chain to make a nifty boat anchor.

    o Or, use a dead iPod to measure the height of a tall building. Here are two
    ways to do this:

    ————–

    How to Measure the Height of a Tall Building
    Using Only a Dead iPod and a Tape Measure

    1. On a sunny day, stand the dead iPod on end, on the ground, in the vicinity
    of the building.

    2. With the tape measure, measure the length of the dead iPod’s shadow on
    the ground.

    3. Measure the height of the dead iPod.

    4. Measure the length of the building’s shadow on the ground.

    5. Using your above measurements and the principle of similar triangles, you
    can compute the height of the building:

    Building height / building shadow = dead iPod height / dead iPod shadow

    Solving for the building height gives:

    Building height = (dead iPod height X building shadow) / dead iPod shadow

    ————–

    How to Measure the Height of a Tall Building
    Using Only a Dead iPod and a Stopwatch

    1. Go to the top of the building.

    2. Drop the dead iPod off the top of the building.

    3. Using the stopwatch, measure the length of time, t, that it takes for the
    dead iPod to fall from the top of the bldg to the ground and smash to
    smithereens.

    4. Using your above time measurement, and knowing the acceleration due to
    gravity, g, you can compute the height of the building:

    g = 32 feet per second per second = 9.8 meters per second per second

    Building height = 1/2 g * t * t

  2. O.K., I know that there must be other uses for a dead iPod besides what’s
    already been mentioned here. But, for the life of me, right now, I can’t think
    of any more. So, how about some frivolous uses? Here goes…

    Other (Tongue-in-Cheek) Uses for a Dead iPod:

    o Use individual dead iPods as paperweights.

    o Or, tie about 5 dead iPods together, to make a functional (and classy!)
    doorstop.

    o Or, tie about 50 dead iPods together, then tie them to one end of a sturdy
    rope or chain to make a nifty boat anchor.

    o Or, use a dead iPod to measure the height of a tall building. Here are two
    ways to do this:

    ————–

    How to Measure the Height of a Tall Building
    Using Only a Dead iPod and a Tape Measure

    1. On a sunny day, stand the dead iPod on end, on the ground, in the vicinity
    of the building.

    2. With the tape measure, measure the length of the dead iPod’s shadow on
    the ground.

    3. Measure the height of the dead iPod.

    4. Measure the length of the building’s shadow on the ground.

    5. Using your above measurements and the principle of similar triangles, you
    can compute the height of the building:

    Building height / building shadow = dead iPod height / dead iPod shadow

    Solving for the building height gives:

    Building height = (dead iPod height X building shadow) / dead iPod shadow

    ————–

    How to Measure the Height of a Tall Building
    Using Only a Dead iPod and a Stopwatch

    1. Go to the top of the building.

    2. Drop the dead iPod off the top of the building.

    3. Using the stopwatch, measure the length of time, t, that it takes for the
    dead iPod to fall from the top of the bldg to the ground and smash to
    smithereens.

    4. Using your above time measurement, and knowing the acceleration due to
    gravity, g, you can compute the height of the building:

    g = 32 feet per second per second = 9.8 meters per second per second

    Building height = 1/2 g * t * t

  3. When your iPod screen is broken:Go along to Rockbox.org and install that on your iPod.Its most useful feature, if you install the voice pack, is speaking menu’s. Yup, thats right. It will speak the names of menu items, albums (well, folders actually) and the names of songs and playlists out loud. So you can use the ipod ‘blind’.I was given an ipod with a broken screen, and it was the first time I owned one, so I never got a chance to learn the menu layout. After installing the rockbox beta and the voice pack, and following the other couple of simple steps for setting up the ipod for speaking file names, i now have a useable ipod without a screen.They’re not yet out of beta though, so if you’re a bit wary hold back. But if you’re like me with nothing to lose on an already broken ipod, give it a try!

    • Thank You! I just did this and it seems to work. I got the iPod for free because my friend decided to bite the screen to death and then gave it to me.Now I have a working 30 gig iPod.

  4. When your iPod screen is broken:Go along to Rockbox.org and install that on your iPod.Its most useful feature, if you install the voice pack, is speaking menu’s. Yup, thats right. It will speak the names of menu items, albums (well, folders actually) and the names of songs and playlists out loud. So you can use the ipod ‘blind’.I was given an ipod with a broken screen, and it was the first time I owned one, so I never got a chance to learn the menu layout. After installing the rockbox beta and the voice pack, and following the other couple of simple steps for setting up the ipod for speaking file names, i now have a useable ipod without a screen.They’re not yet out of beta though, so if you’re a bit wary hold back. But if you’re like me with nothing to lose on an already broken ipod, give it a try!

    • Thank You! I just did this and it seems to work. I got the iPod for free because my friend decided to bite the screen to death and then gave it to me.Now I have a working 30 gig iPod.

  5. I have 3 different iPods – Shuffle 1gb – Nano 2gb – Photo 60gb

    Recently my Shuffle took a turn for the worse, and wouldn’t retain files. They would simply dissappear randomly! Quite an odd situation…

    Anyhow, I am lucky enough to have an Apple store near me, so I decided to take it there to see if the folks at the “Genius Bar” could assist me. After a 45 minute wait, my name finally came up!

    After a couple questions and quick examination of the ipod, the Genius Bar associate ran to the back room and quickly returned with a brand new 1GB Shuffle, still in the wrapped box! Yes, he completely replaced the iPod for me!

    I know the iPod was purchased IN EXCESS of one year earlier, so I don’t honestly know why he completely replaced it for me!?!?

    Was he just lazy, and didn’t want to deal with it? Is it because it was only a cheap Shuffle? Or maybe they will just replace your iPod if you have the motivation to bring them the old one? I don’t know!

    Before turning your dead ipod into some odd science experiment, consider bringing it to an Apple store! You may get lucky like I did!

    Mike J
    Author of “Vexation Fixation”
    Vexation Fixation
    Fixing some of Life’s Common Problems!

    • In the UK when the initial apple warranty is up after a year, you’re covered by the Sale Of Goods Act. This means that if something you’ve purchased (including an iPod) develops a fault within 6 years (5 in Scotland), then you have a right to ask whoever originally sold you it (in this case it could be an Apple store or somewhere like Comet) for a free repair or replacement. The Sale Of Goods Act covers most purchases that you make everyday and is why consumer watchdogs tell you that purchasing extra insurance to cover breakdowns is unnecessary. If something develops a fault within 5 years of purchase, your 1st phone call should always be to Consumer Direct.

  6. I have 3 different iPods – Shuffle 1gb – Nano 2gb – Photo 60gb

    Recently my Shuffle took a turn for the worse, and wouldn’t retain files. They would simply dissappear randomly! Quite an odd situation…

    Anyhow, I am lucky enough to have an Apple store near me, so I decided to take it there to see if the folks at the “Genius Bar” could assist me. After a 45 minute wait, my name finally came up!

    After a couple questions and quick examination of the ipod, the Genius Bar associate ran to the back room and quickly returned with a brand new 1GB Shuffle, still in the wrapped box! Yes, he completely replaced the iPod for me!

    I know the iPod was purchased IN EXCESS of one year earlier, so I don’t honestly know why he completely replaced it for me!?!?

    Was he just lazy, and didn’t want to deal with it? Is it because it was only a cheap Shuffle? Or maybe they will just replace your iPod if you have the motivation to bring them the old one? I don’t know!

    Before turning your dead ipod into some odd science experiment, consider bringing it to an Apple store! You may get lucky like I did!

    Mike J
    Author of “Vexation Fixation”
    Vexation Fixation
    Fixing some of Life’s Common Problems!

    • In the UK when the initial apple warranty is up after a year, you’re covered by the Sale Of Goods Act. This means that if something you’ve purchased (including an iPod) develops a fault within 6 years (5 in Scotland), then you have a right to ask whoever originally sold you it (in this case it could be an Apple store or somewhere like Comet) for a free repair or replacement. The Sale Of Goods Act covers most purchases that you make everyday and is why consumer watchdogs tell you that purchasing extra insurance to cover breakdowns is unnecessary. If something develops a fault within 5 years of purchase, your 1st phone call should always be to Consumer Direct.

  7. I had a 2G iPod where the PC foil came loose from the PC board at the headphone jack. The charge would have been $150 to have it re-bonded, but they couldn’t guarantee that it would work. So I got a new iPod!

    I did a variation on your backup hard drive. I found a slick little USB 2.0 case for $12 and put the iPod 20 GB hard drive into it. I now use it as an Ubuntu Linux drive for my work notebook computer. Even the Grub boot loader is on there, so the IT guys from work cannot see any personal files. It works great.

    zafo

  8. I had a 2G iPod where the PC foil came loose from the PC board at the headphone jack. The charge would have been $150 to have it re-bonded, but they couldn’t guarantee that it would work. So I got a new iPod!

    I did a variation on your backup hard drive. I found a slick little USB 2.0 case for $12 and put the iPod 20 GB hard drive into it. I now use it as an Ubuntu Linux drive for my work notebook computer. Even the Grub boot loader is on there, so the IT guys from work cannot see any personal files. It works great.

    zafo

  9. well my ipod went bottom up on me. the hard drive gave out. here are the ideas i came up with.

    1. you can take it abart and use it as a wallet. it holds cash or cards.

    2. use it as a piggy bank. the slot at the bottom is great for puting coins in.

    3. paint it! nothing looks better on your desk then a tydye ipod.

    4. take it abart and put a cheap mp3 in it. kinda dumb but looks funny.

    5. take it abart and put a phone in it.

    6. (this is what i did) if you have a big enof ipod you can fit a phone and an mp3. budget iphone! this as the two above takes some doing. so eather know what your doing or move on.

    7. two words. fire crakers

    thats about all i came up with

  10. well my ipod went bottom up on me. the hard drive gave out. here are the ideas i came up with.

    1. you can take it abart and use it as a wallet. it holds cash or cards.

    2. use it as a piggy bank. the slot at the bottom is great for puting coins in.

    3. paint it! nothing looks better on your desk then a tydye ipod.

    4. take it abart and put a cheap mp3 in it. kinda dumb but looks funny.

    5. take it abart and put a phone in it.

    6. (this is what i did) if you have a big enof ipod you can fit a phone and an mp3. budget iphone! this as the two above takes some doing. so eather know what your doing or move on.

    7. two words. fire crakers

    thats about all i came up with

  11. After 3 years of abusing my ipod mini, throwing it, bashing it, leaving it in the bottom of my bag underneath amazingly heavy maths books, etc, it died, not just dead battery died but froze, wouldn’t unfreeze, tried connecting it to a computer, did nothing for 4 hours, tried pressing the buttons, then this little screen came on of a picture of an ipod with a face, the eyes xed out, i looked this up on the apple site and it basically meant that it was stuffed, so I told my friends that we were going to have some fun up on the top of the school grandstand, i brought my dead ipod mini, showed them the dead screen, stood it on the top step of the grandstand and kicked with all my might, then people saw and I had a crowd of people helping destroy it and taking pieces that came off, there were 40 ore 50 people, it was completely insane.

    • Take it to you nearest apple store with some cash and get a new ipod with a
      10% price reduction…..sorry, shuffles are excluded.

      My first gen is about to become "the wife’s" Touch.

  12. After 3 years of abusing my ipod mini, throwing it, bashing it, leaving it in the bottom of my bag underneath amazingly heavy maths books, etc, it died, not just dead battery died but froze, wouldn’t unfreeze, tried connecting it to a computer, did nothing for 4 hours, tried pressing the buttons, then this little screen came on of a picture of an ipod with a face, the eyes xed out, i looked this up on the apple site and it basically meant that it was stuffed, so I told my friends that we were going to have some fun up on the top of the school grandstand, i brought my dead ipod mini, showed them the dead screen, stood it on the top step of the grandstand and kicked with all my might, then people saw and I had a crowd of people helping destroy it and taking pieces that came off, there were 40 ore 50 people, it was completely insane.

    • Take it to you nearest apple store with some cash and get a new ipod with a
      10% price reduction…..sorry, shuffles are excluded.

      My first gen is about to become "the wife’s" Touch.

  13. I have an iPod Classic 160 GB.

    How does one implement the below? Doesn’t it require you to have the iPod connected to a power source independent of the battery like a power adapter and to your computer at the same time? How does one do that? Thank you.

    "Another way to use an iPod sans battery is to use it as a music source for iTunes on your computer, at home or at work. If you manually copy music to the iPod (which you can still do, even without a battery, as long as the iPod is connected to power), you can then connect the iPod to any computer running iTunes and play its music back, browsing, using playlists, or simply selecting songs, exactly as if it were an iTunes music library on that computer."

    • You either keep it plugged into your computer with a USB cable, or, if it’s
      external, plug a charger into a dock in which you place the iPod. In both cases,
      it’ll get the power it needs. In the latter case, it can be a source for a stereo or
      for portable speakers from the dock.

  14. I have an iPod Classic 160 GB.

    How does one implement the below? Doesn’t it require you to have the iPod connected to a power source independent of the battery like a power adapter and to your computer at the same time? How does one do that? Thank you.

    "Another way to use an iPod sans battery is to use it as a music source for iTunes on your computer, at home or at work. If you manually copy music to the iPod (which you can still do, even without a battery, as long as the iPod is connected to power), you can then connect the iPod to any computer running iTunes and play its music back, browsing, using playlists, or simply selecting songs, exactly as if it were an iTunes music library on that computer."

    • You either keep it plugged into your computer with a USB cable, or, if it’s
      external, plug a charger into a dock in which you place the iPod. In both cases,
      it’ll get the power it needs. In the latter case, it can be a source for a stereo or
      for portable speakers from the dock.

  15. Mine won’t work with or without a battery in this case-it just says please wait very low battery.
    I can’t access it via hard disk mode or update/format it in any way. I do want some of the tunes i had on it, some of the functionality back, but honestly the Geek in me wants to figure out and resolve the issue.

  16. Mine won’t work with or without a battery in this case-it just says please wait very low battery.
    I can’t access it via hard disk mode or update/format it in any way. I do want some of the tunes i had on it, some of the functionality back, but honestly the Geek in me wants to figure out and resolve the issue.

  17. There is a simpler method to measure the height of a building using a dead iPod, and it’s not destructive, and it doesn’t require any knowledge of physics or math. Just go find the owner of the building and say, “Hey, if you tell me the height of your building, I will give you this dead iPod.”

  18. There is a simpler method to measure the height of a building using a dead iPod, and it’s not destructive, and it doesn’t require any knowledge of physics or math. Just go find the owner of the building and say, “Hey, if you tell me the height of your building, I will give you this dead iPod.”

  19. My iPod Photo has a different problem. The battery is fine, the backlight is fine, and I can hear the songs. There is light on the screen but no writing. No menu shows up, no letters on the screen. Does anyone have any idea what happened?

  20. My iPod Photo has a different problem. The battery is fine, the backlight is fine, and I can hear the songs. There is light on the screen but no writing. No menu shows up, no letters on the screen. Does anyone have any idea what happened?

  21. I have a 20GB ipod and its battery is completely dead, so as you said I want to use it just for the car. It works, but the thing is that now I can’t add anymore music to it! when i connect it to the computer the “charging battery” icon appears and the ipod never starts up since the battery holds literaly cero charging. When it was new the ipod waited to have a a minimal amount of charge before starting up and connect to the computer but now that minimum amount just never comes along so it never get recognized by the computer. Also, I cant use it as a portable hard drive for the same reason.
    Do you have any ideas on how to go around this problem??

    • When it’s plugged into your car socket, turn the hold switch on. This should keep enough power in it to get it to your computer and get it connected to itunes. It works with mine. Good luck. 🙂

  22. I have a 20GB ipod and its battery is completely dead, so as you said I want to use it just for the car. It works, but the thing is that now I can’t add anymore music to it! when i connect it to the computer the “charging battery” icon appears and the ipod never starts up since the battery holds literaly cero charging. When it was new the ipod waited to have a a minimal amount of charge before starting up and connect to the computer but now that minimum amount just never comes along so it never get recognized by the computer. Also, I cant use it as a portable hard drive for the same reason.
    Do you have any ideas on how to go around this problem??

    • When it’s plugged into your car socket, turn the hold switch on. This should keep enough power in it to get it to your computer and get it connected to itunes. It works with mine. Good luck. 🙂

  23. What about if my ipod tell me nothing but an exclamation poin (!) inside a triangle an a picture of an ipod with a face like this… x_x
    is ther someway i can get my music back? :/

  24. What about if my ipod tell me nothing but an exclamation poin (!) inside a triangle an a picture of an ipod with a face like this… x_x
    is ther someway i can get my music back? :/

  25. Hi,

    My ipod´s main circuitboard or motherboard got damaged, i took it apart and was wondering if i could use the hard drive as an external drive?

  26. Hi,

    My ipod´s main circuitboard or motherboard got damaged, i took it apart and was wondering if i could use the hard drive as an external drive?

  27. The clasp that connects my battery to the ipod is missing, so that’s why my ipod doesn’t register a battery. My computer doesn’t read my ipod either without battery connectivity. For those above who have a dead battery, check ebay or amazon to purchase a new one (mine was $10) which is really worth it.

  28. The clasp that connects my battery to the ipod is missing, so that’s why my ipod doesn’t register a battery. My computer doesn’t read my ipod either without battery connectivity. For those above who have a dead battery, check ebay or amazon to purchase a new one (mine was $10) which is really worth it.

  29. My IPod Classic 60GB is dead – battery and AC adaptor too. It used to be sitting on a JBL Ipod docking station and got recharged automatically. Now the screen is dead and I am unable to recharge it through any option (not tried the car adaptor yet). The local Apple store suggested exchanging it for a similar model restored version. Will set me back by $100 or thereabouts. Any other suggestions? There is no apparent damage to the 6 year old model.

  30. My IPod Classic 60GB is dead – battery and AC adaptor too. It used to be sitting on a JBL Ipod docking station and got recharged automatically. Now the screen is dead and I am unable to recharge it through any option (not tried the car adaptor yet). The local Apple store suggested exchanging it for a similar model restored version. Will set me back by $100 or thereabouts. Any other suggestions? There is no apparent damage to the 6 year old model.

  31. Is it possible to use an iPod that has been setup for use as a drive along with Time Machine? That way everytime I plug it in, it will automatically complete the back-up instead of me having to manually do it.

  32. Is it possible to use an iPod that has been setup for use as a drive along with Time Machine? That way everytime I plug it in, it will automatically complete the back-up instead of me having to manually do it.

  33. Reading Subbu and Duffman’s posts above sounds strangely like mine!

    How do you know when it’s completely dead?

    I have a 60GB iPod Classic which is many years old. It was working fine then one day it just clicked a few times before the whole thing became frozen with the light on.

    I pressed play/select and it started to reboot before the screen went black again. If I hold it at a certain angle, I can just about see a little iPod icon with a sad face and exclamation mark in a triangle, along with advice to contact Apple support.

    If I press play/select again, I can see a badly drawn image, possibly a battery which is 1/3 full. When working the battery was showing full as I had just charged it.

    I have tried connecting the iPod to iTunes but it does not recognise that it is connected.

    Please help?!

      • Thanks for the rply, Kirk. Is there anyway I can check without having to contact Apple and probably parting with shed loads of cash?

        • My guess is that you won’t be able to fix one that old. If it’s just the hard disk, you could change it – there are companies that will do it for you – but you might want to simply buy a new one.

          • Thanks again, Kirk. I spoke with Apple yesterday and we tried to do a couple of tests, but it never got beyond the sad iPod face. Apple are saying that it’s likely one of two things – a battery at £39 + VAT or a hard disc fault repair for around £116 + VAT. I checked how old it is – 2006!!

            Looks like it’s about to become a paperweight!

            :o(

  34. Reading Subbu and Duffman’s posts above sounds strangely like mine!

    How do you know when it’s completely dead?

    I have a 60GB iPod Classic which is many years old. It was working fine then one day it just clicked a few times before the whole thing became frozen with the light on.

    I pressed play/select and it started to reboot before the screen went black again. If I hold it at a certain angle, I can just about see a little iPod icon with a sad face and exclamation mark in a triangle, along with advice to contact Apple support.

    If I press play/select again, I can see a badly drawn image, possibly a battery which is 1/3 full. When working the battery was showing full as I had just charged it.

    I have tried connecting the iPod to iTunes but it does not recognise that it is connected.

    Please help?!

      • Thanks for the rply, Kirk. Is there anyway I can check without having to contact Apple and probably parting with shed loads of cash?

        • My guess is that you won’t be able to fix one that old. If it’s just the hard disk, you could change it – there are companies that will do it for you – but you might want to simply buy a new one.

          • Thanks again, Kirk. I spoke with Apple yesterday and we tried to do a couple of tests, but it never got beyond the sad iPod face. Apple are saying that it’s likely one of two things – a battery at £39 + VAT or a hard disc fault repair for around £116 + VAT. I checked how old it is – 2006!!

            Looks like it’s about to become a paperweight!

            :o(

    • Don’t turn it on. Let it sit as long as you can to dry out, and it may work. I’ve heard of cases where this has worked. If you have a hairdryer, you can try blowing it into the dock connector for a while – not too hot – to dry it out as much as possible.

    • mine got drenched in rain. it recovered after 5 days in a ziploc bag with silica gel that i replaced every 8 hours. the only piece of electronics that survived, lol

    • Don’t turn it on. Let it sit as long as you can to dry out, and it may work. I’ve heard of cases where this has worked. If you have a hairdryer, you can try blowing it into the dock connector for a while – not too hot – to dry it out as much as possible.

    • mine got drenched in rain. it recovered after 5 days in a ziploc bag with silica gel that i replaced every 8 hours. the only piece of electronics that survived, lol

  35. i have a 10 year old ipod classic 120gb! landed here because the battery life is now down to 6 hours from the 30 it’d give when new… and coincidentally it’s currently playing “baby i’m the lucky one” lol

  36. i have a 10 year old ipod classic 120gb! landed here because the battery life is now down to 6 hours from the 30 it’d give when new… and coincidentally it’s currently playing “baby i’m the lucky one” lol

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