Where Are All the Apple Leaks?

Apple is known as a secretive company (though probably no more or less secretive than others). They keep their new products close to the vest until they are announced. Nevertheless, there are lots of leaks about new Apple products, in the months, weeks, and days before their announcement.

Naturally, many, if not most of these leaks are intentional. Apple hides what it’s doing until it doesn’t want to hide it any more, and leaking information about new products is a good way to get attention in the press.

But this year, there are hardly any leaks. Apple’s annual World Wide Developer Conference kicks off next week, and there have been hardly any leaks. John Gruber points out, on Daring Fireball, that a story in Bloomberg about the coming Siri speaker takes a long time to present exactly one sentence of news:

800-word report for Bloomberg by Mark Gurman and Alex Webb on Apple’s long-rumored Siri speaker product, with one sentence of actual news:

“The iPhone-maker has started manufacturing a long-in-the-works Siri-controlled smart speaker, according to people familiar with the matter.”

Seriously, that’s about it for news about the product.

Even when Apple has released important new products, there have been leaks. But this time, nothing. Not even hints about incremental upgrades to Macs, nothing about new features in iOS or macOS, and not even a peep about anything else.

Secretive Apple? Or just nothing new in the cards for next week (except for the Siri speaker)?

6 thoughts on “Where Are All the Apple Leaks?

  1. I am confused. Perhaps you are referring to actual leaks instead of rumours? I understand your perspective from the point of view of software. Not much on that front. But I feel that my daily Google feed has been buzzing for weeks about articles from Cult of Mac, MacRumours, 9to5Mac, and even CNET (and other Android-prone communities) confirming that we will most likely see a new version of the retina MacBook and new MacBook Pros with Kaby Lake (no other cosmetic changes). All other rumours come and go, but that one is really persistent. Which sources do you usually trust that would have normally provided additional information at this point? I am interested in differentiating between chitchat and substantiated rumours.

    • Many of the rumors we hear are based on Apple leaks. None of those rumors seem convincing enough, at least not yet. Sure, new MacBooks and MBPs, which are minor updates, but there’s nothing else that has been rumored or leaked.

  2. I am confused. Perhaps you are referring to actual leaks instead of rumours? I understand your perspective from the point of view of software. Not much on that front. But I feel that my daily Google feed has been buzzing for weeks about articles from Cult of Mac, MacRumours, 9to5Mac, and even CNET (and other Android-prone communities) confirming that we will most likely see a new version of the retina MacBook and new MacBook Pros with Kaby Lake (no other cosmetic changes). All other rumours come and go, but that one is really persistent. Which sources do you usually trust that would have normally provided additional information at this point? I am interested in differentiating between chitchat and substantiated rumours.

    • Many of the rumors we hear are based on Apple leaks. None of those rumors seem convincing enough, at least not yet. Sure, new MacBooks and MBPs, which are minor updates, but there’s nothing else that has been rumored or leaked.

  3. Part of the reason might be that traditionally WWDC is a developer-focused event and it’s easier to keep software under wraps than it is hardware. Probably because you just need to keep your own employees under your own roof quiet versus the thousands of Foxconn employees manufacturing millions of phone units so that the thing can go on sale quickly after the announcements. Someone sneaks a photo of the thing they’re handling to MacRumors and gets paid.

    Consider that at WWDC 2014 they unveiled Swift, a brand new programming language, which had been in the works secretly for years, and no one saw it coming. I was there, word going around was that a large chunk of Apple engineers didn’t even know about it.

    This year sounds like it will be different in that there may be hardware announcements but they sound like they’re minor upgrades to existing products (so not a lot of things that a photograph would prove) or things not shipping until the fall like the Siri speaker.

    I seem to recall when they originally announced Apple TV it was a surprise people didn’t see coming and the fact that it wasn’t going to ship for several months probably helped keep it a secret. Plus people were interested in iPhone and iPad and no one really cared about the television box market yet. The Siri Speaker’s at least rumored because this is actually an up and coming category people do care about.

  4. Part of the reason might be that traditionally WWDC is a developer-focused event and it’s easier to keep software under wraps than it is hardware. Probably because you just need to keep your own employees under your own roof quiet versus the thousands of Foxconn employees manufacturing millions of phone units so that the thing can go on sale quickly after the announcements. Someone sneaks a photo of the thing they’re handling to MacRumors and gets paid.

    Consider that at WWDC 2014 they unveiled Swift, a brand new programming language, which had been in the works secretly for years, and no one saw it coming. I was there, word going around was that a large chunk of Apple engineers didn’t even know about it.

    This year sounds like it will be different in that there may be hardware announcements but they sound like they’re minor upgrades to existing products (so not a lot of things that a photograph would prove) or things not shipping until the fall like the Siri speaker.

    I seem to recall when they originally announced Apple TV it was a surprise people didn’t see coming and the fact that it wasn’t going to ship for several months probably helped keep it a secret. Plus people were interested in iPhone and iPad and no one really cared about the television box market yet. The Siri Speaker’s at least rumored because this is actually an up and coming category people do care about.

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