Why Apple Music Is So Bad When the iPhone Is So Good – The New Yorker

On April 28, 2003, Apple launched the iTunes Music Store, saving the music industry from the scourge of piracy while creating a large and steady source of revenue for Apple. Thirteen years later, however, what started as a simple and intuitive way to find music has become a cluttered festoonery of features.

“a cluttered festoonery of features.” Om Malik nails it in this article about iTunes and, more specifically, Apple Music.

He points out that Apple is planning to launch a new version of Apple Music at next month’s WWDC, but I’m starting to wonder why Apple is so locked into these events for releasing what are essentially software fixes. If the new Apple Music is ready, ship it!

Source: Why Apple Music Is So Bad When the iPhone Is So Good – The New Yorker

8 thoughts on “Why Apple Music Is So Bad When the iPhone Is So Good – The New Yorker

  1. Couldn’t agree more. Unfortunately for me, iTunes is unusable now, with constant crashes “iTunes has stopped working” on Windows 10. It started with 12.3.3 and continues with 12.4. As it’s my music organization program, I’m at a loss of what to do next as a delete and reinstall has not fixed anything.

  2. Couldn’t agree more. Unfortunately for me, iTunes is unusable now, with constant crashes “iTunes has stopped working” on Windows 10. It started with 12.3.3 and continues with 12.4. As it’s my music organization program, I’m at a loss of what to do next as a delete and reinstall has not fixed anything.

  3. Years ago, Apple backed out of Macworld trade shows at least in part because it did not want to be beholden to a third party’s schedule. It’s traded one rigid schedule for another fairly rigid one (albeit one of its own making).

    I will cut them a little slack. Apple knows it is going to have a developer conference each year, which advances its interest in promoting its platforms. It also knows that the conference presents an opportunity for press coverage. It makes sense that they want to use this event to show off some new products, and that means holding a few products in reserve so that they can be rolled out at once.

    Understandable, but not in the immediate interests of the customers. I think (you and) Om are correct, that software should be continuously fine-tuned, continuously improved, and continuously brought up to date.

    Maybe use events for 1) hardware and 2) “capital” software–e.g., new developer tools and languages like Swift.

    • But Apple no longer needs an event like the WWDC for press coverage. They’ll get coverage at any time; they can have a shorter, single-product event. Perhaps they are actually planning this in the new campus, which will have a theater that is big enough for such events.

  4. Years ago, Apple backed out of Macworld trade shows at least in part because it did not want to be beholden to a third party’s schedule. It’s traded one rigid schedule for another fairly rigid one (albeit one of its own making).

    I will cut them a little slack. Apple knows it is going to have a developer conference each year, which advances its interest in promoting its platforms. It also knows that the conference presents an opportunity for press coverage. It makes sense that they want to use this event to show off some new products, and that means holding a few products in reserve so that they can be rolled out at once.

    Understandable, but not in the immediate interests of the customers. I think (you and) Om are correct, that software should be continuously fine-tuned, continuously improved, and continuously brought up to date.

    Maybe use events for 1) hardware and 2) “capital” software–e.g., new developer tools and languages like Swift.

    • But Apple no longer needs an event like the WWDC for press coverage. They’ll get coverage at any time; they can have a shorter, single-product event. Perhaps they are actually planning this in the new campus, which will have a theater that is big enough for such events.

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